The History of Surgery

Surgery is a growing field. New technologies and methods for carrying out procedures are constantly evolving, making surgery much more safer and result in higher success rates. However, in the past, this wasn't at all the case. All aspects of medicine weren't as advanced and were completely different, including surgery. Anaesthesia wasn’t even around until … Continue reading The History of Surgery

Telomeres and why we age.

What are telomeres? Telomeres are caps at the end of our chromosomes that protect our DNA from damage. They are made up of the same short DNA sequence repeated over and over again, with the same sequence of bases. They are important for a cells because without them chromosomes would stick together and would not … Continue reading Telomeres and why we age.

The History of The Atomic Model

Atoms, derived from the Greek word ‘Atomos’, meaning indivisible, make up everything in the world. They are the smallest part of elements that can exist, but what exactly is the structure of an atom like on the inside? Protons, neutrons and electrons, which are subatomic particles, make up atoms. Each proton has a relative charge … Continue reading The History of The Atomic Model

Using Board Games to Teach Science: Carbon City Zero

Next up, in this board game series about how board games can be used to teach science (to children’s adults and families alike), is the environmentally conscious deck builder, Carbon City Zero. If you’ve not seen the series before, then you can find out more about it here, and if you missed the last one … Continue reading Using Board Games to Teach Science: Carbon City Zero

Meet Jen

My name is Jen and I’m a trainee Medical Physicist in the Radiotherapy Department at St. James’ Hospital in Leeds. I’m currently training to become a qualified Clinical Scientist in Radiotherapy Physics as part of the national Scientist Training Programme. Before I go into too much detail about my current role, I’ll just give you … Continue reading Meet Jen

The Speed of Light – So Agonisingly Slow.

The speed of light is as frustrating as it is fascinating. The speed of light in a vacuum is the fastest thing we can measure at 300,000km per second, although in a vast and ever expanding universe, it is painfully slow. The universe currently measures 45 billion light years in all directions of observation. So … Continue reading The Speed of Light – So Agonisingly Slow.

Using Radio Waves and Other Means To Make Contact.

Last week I wrote about the WOW! Signal. The most likely candidate for a formal effort of contact from extra-terrestrials due to its irregular and almost artificial qualities. This does pose a thought, are radio waves the best way to establish contact? Although radio signals are received by radio telescopes every day, some are extremely … Continue reading Using Radio Waves and Other Means To Make Contact.

Extraterrestrial Contact Series Part 1 – The Wow! Signal.

All over social media, there are articles discussing radio signals from other galaxies and stellar systems. The number one rule in astrophysics and cosmology is - IT IS NEVER ALIENS. A lot of radio signals can be interpreted and can have natural sources; rapidly rotating neutron stars, supermassive black holes and so on. So how … Continue reading Extraterrestrial Contact Series Part 1 – The Wow! Signal.

Cosmic Water Series Part 3 – Water in The Early Universe.

 By Jude Morrow My latest two blog posts regarding surface water on Mars and Titan seem to have generated an influx of questions. When researching material for blog series’, the questions and comments seem to give inspiration for future posts. One such comment mentioned a large reservoir of water located at a proper distance of … Continue reading Cosmic Water Series Part 3 – Water in The Early Universe.